Rana el Kaliouby grew up in Egypt and Kuwait with a demanding traditionalist father. They were a hardworking, upwardly mobile family until a devastating sequence of emotional breakdowns began to rip through their family. Drawing from her award-winning research into entrepreneurial intuition and implicit decision-making, Laura Huang, an associate professor at the Harvard Business School, has cracked the code and discovered a way to turn weaknesses into strengths and gain the edge necessary to turn any situation to your favor. Brian Eisch’s overseas tours of duty took an immense toll on his two young sons, Isaac and Joey, and his return home from the battlefield with a catastrophic leg injury only compounded their unique family dynamic. Robert Stone stands as one of the preeminent novelists of postwar American literature. Florian Zeller’s The Father conveys the terror, fury and anguish of dementia from the inside-out, assuming the unreliable and fragmented perspective of its protagonist, Anthony (Anthony Hopkins), until the boundaries between reality and delusion are as bewildering to us as to him. As Steve soon learns, synchronic has the capacity to spirit users to bygone eras, which instigates a quest that speaks directly to larger issues of mortality, loss, grief, and the push-pull between dreams and reality. Staged on a massive scale, overflowing with nattily dressed heroes and villains, and set to an unnervingly blaring electronica score by Ludwig Göransson, it’s a temporally wonky spectacular to be experienced rather than lucidly understood. This is the story of how one of modern history’s most storied figures held a nation together. Fourteen years after becoming a household name, Sacha Baron Cohen’s Khazakstani reporter Borat Sagdiyev returns to mock racist, misogynistic, anti-Semitic Americans in Borat Subsequent Moviefilm, the rare comedy sequel to equal the side-splitting hilarity of its predecessor. Oz Perkins is a horror lyricist fixated on grief and female agency, and both factor heavily into his atmospheric reimagining of the classic fairy tale. Wolfe keeps the material spry and sensual (as well as explosive) by keeping his roving camera trained on his stars, who swing for the fences with ferocious gusto. Weeks’ scares are assured, and all the better for being intertwined with his protagonists’ complicated refugee circumstances, with Bol eager to fit in and Rial increasingly resentful about her rootless condition. Alice and Roberta’s bond is particularly fractured thanks to the latter’s suspicion that her real-life ordeals were exploited by the former for her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel. And you can watch them right now. Sit back, relax, put up your feet and have the best time reading these u8nforgettable 5 best non-fiction books. Kiyoshi Kurosawa conjures an atmosphere of humorous dislocation and acute fear with To the Ends of the Earth, the story of a travel TV show host named Yoko (Atsuko Maeda) who’s on assignment with her all-male crew in Uzbekistan. Writer/director Bryan Bertino once again takes a simple premise and maximizes it for unbearable tension, drawing out white-knuckle suspense from Louise and Michael’s efforts to grapple with tragedy (and impending loss) while simultaneously reckoning with unholy forces beyond their comprehension or control. Thrillingly grand and revealingly intimate, it paints a timely portrait of the heroism, and sacrifices, required to uphold democracy. It was an extraordinary 9.2 on the Richter Scale—the ground literally lurched and rolled, streets broke open, and buildings crumbled. December 28, 2020 by … Bolstered by Dirisu and Mosaku’s heartfelt turns as lost souls desperate for forgiveness and peace, it’s a film whose haunting, dreamlike terror proves an expression of lingering trauma. As the author of Dog Soldiers and A Flag of Sunrise, Stone proved an extraordinary talent and powerful critic of American influence. Adapted from Jonathan Raymond’s novel The Half Life, Reichardt’s slow-burn drama focuses on a nomadic 1820s chef named Cookie (John Magaro) who, after arriving at a Pacific Northwest fort, befriends and goes into business with on-the-run Chinese loner King Lu (Orion Lee), baking and selling popular “oily cakes” made with milk stolen from a dairy cow owned by wealthy Chief Factor (Toby Jones). The murderous threesome seems to have leapt to life from a painted music box coveted by the couple’s child, thereby casting the proceedings as a symbolic portrait of heartache as a never-ending predator intent on destruction. Shot with bobbing, swaying gracefulness that’s in tune with its environment, it’s an evocative, empathetic and altogether unforgettable portrait of life on the fringe, where escape from reality is a constant—if self-destructive—desire, and solace is only found at the bottom of a glass, in the company of fellow drunks. Most of all, though, it’s a saga about perseverance and bravery, two qualities that Neulinger – then, and now – exhibits in spades. That’s as arduous a job as Tolontan’s quest to speak truth to power, and the film traces both of their efforts during an election year in which the reforms they seek are threatened by an old guard that wants to return to the crooked past. Charlie Kaufman once again descends into a surrealistic pit of death and despair with his adaptation of Iain Reid’s 2016 novel, which charts a road trip by Jake (Jesse Plemons) and his girlfriend (Jessie Buckley) to his parents’ rural farmhouse home. It is a deep dive into the other, oft-overlooked scandal of the Nixon White House: Vice President Spiro Agnew’s years-long extortion and bribery scheme. The most coveted of those positions is governor, which pits progressively oriented Steven against conservative Eddy in a battle that echoes those being waged in the corridors of Washington, DC power today. Plummeting down a rabbit hole of confusion, longing, regret and grief, I’m Thinking of Ending Things is a film of careening left turns. Showing science fiction movies Monsters of Man December 8, 2020. Get weekly book recommendations delivered right to your inbox and find out What We’re Reading. Hunted by police captain Liu (Liao Fan), Diao’s protagonists are engaged in a deadly game that’s played in silence because they all inherently know the rules, and their sense of purpose is echoed by the film itself, which orchestrates its underworld conflicts with bracing precision. Marinelli’s performance is similarly fraught, his gargantuan presence as entrancing as it is intimidating. March 12, 2020 By Molly Odintz. In a countryside beset by an unknown plague, teenage Gretel (It’s Sophia Lillis) refuses to work as an old creepy man’s housekeeper, and is thus thrown out by her mother, forced to take her young brother Hansel (Sam Leakey) on a journey through the dark woods to a convent she has no interest in joining. Pages in category "Fiction set in 2020" The following 18 pages are in this category, out of 18 total. As with Lover’s Rock (another entry in the filmmaker’s quintet), McQueen imparts a genuine sense of his immigrant milieu. "Non-Fiction" is definitely a talking movie with, maybe, 3 minutes of silence, no dialogue! Roaring blast-beat assaults give way to eerie silence for Ruben (Riz Ahmed), a punk-metal drummer whose hearing disappears suddenly, and terrifyingly, in writer/director Darius Marder’s Sound of Metal. As envisioned by writer/director Eliza Hittman (Beach Rats), Autumn’s with-child circumstance leads to a harrowing ordeal of uncomfortable doctor visits, financial anxieties, and incessant indignities suffered at the hands of men, be it sexually harassing classmates, her drunk and uncaring father (Ryan Eggold), or a boy (Théodore Pellerin) she and Skylar meet on the bus to Manhattan. From tales of true crime to riveting memoirs of astounding lives, this list features 12 of our favorite compelling nonfiction works that have inspired some truly great movies. Here are the 10 Best Books of 2020, along with 100 Notable Books of the year. Led by the heroic Judy Heumann and many of her fellow Jened alums, a civil rights movement was born, resulting in the famous San Francisco sit-in to compel U.S. Secretary of Health, Education and Wellness Joseph Califano to sign Section 504 of 1973’s Rehabilitation Act, and later, the ADA. At the same time, his centerpiece sequences are models of formal precision and depth, as protracted shots across sprawling fields, through crowded gymnasiums, and in and out of cramped buildings create pulse-pounding tension while simultaneously conveying the propulsive flow and binding, interconnected nature of narrative storytelling itself. 2020 is a banner year for nonfiction releases. Here, New York Times business reporter Nelson D. Schwartz takes a look into the dividing line that separates the nation’s wealthy elite from its middle and working classes. With his unprecedented access to Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg, renowned tech journalist Steven Levy has crafted the definitive history of one of the country’s most powerful companies. Fortunately for el Kaliouby, her mother was a pioneer in her own right and one of the first female computer programmers in the Middle East. A gentle film that radiates overpowering compassion for its characters and their plights, writer/director Lee Isaac Chung’s Minari charts the 1980s endeavor by Korean husband/father Jacob Yi (Steven Yeun) to make something of himself by starting a farm in rural Arkansas – an American dream that worries his wife Monica (Han Ye-Ri), and poses challenges for his daughter Anne (Noel Kate Cho) and son David (Alan Kim), the latter of whom suffers from a potentially fatal heart condition. We are experiencing an error, please try again. Using Robert Kolker’s book as her source, director Liz Garbus recounts Mari Gilbert’s (Amy Ryan) efforts to find her oldest daughter Shannan, a prostitute, after she vanished following a house call in a gated Long Island community. A companion piece to last year’s excellent The Cold Blue, Erik Nelson’s Apocalypse ’45 imparts a striking sense of WWII chaos and carnage via newly unearthed and restored material shot during America’s campaign against the Japanese in the Pacific theater. Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne gaze into the dark heart of religious fanaticism in Young Ahmed, a drama that’s all the more chilling for proffering no easy answers. Spike Lee goes for broke with Da 5 Bloods, tackling historic and modern racism, oppression, guilt, greed and brotherhood through the story of four Vietnam Vets (played by Delroy Lindo, Clarke Peters, Isiah Whitlock Jr. and Norm Lewis) who, along with the son of Lindo’s character (Jonathan Majors), return to Southeast Asia to both recover the remains of their fallen comrade Stormin’ Norman (Chadwick Boseman) and to find the gold they buried years ago. And while myriad benefits may come with this decline, the enormous disruption that will accompany it could be equally as destabilizing as over-population. The film’s formal grandeur – its compositional precision, and painterly interplay of light and dark – is overwhelming, as is the majestic presence of Vitalina herself. Aided by Liberato’s accomplished performance, first-time writer/director Jeffrey A. Diao’s neo-noir follows a gangster named Zhou Zenong (Hu Ge) who, after killing a cop in a criminal enterprise gone awry, partners with a “bathing beauty” prostitute named Lu Aiai (Gwei Lun Mei) in order to reunite with his estranged wife Yang Shujun (Wan Qian), all so she might collect the reward on his head. Guns, abortion and immigration are the most contentious of the hot-button topics tackled by these would-be representatives, and through their campaigns, what emerges is a portrait of politics as a war defined by personalities, prejudices, fearmongering, and dirty tricks and slander. Esquire participates in various affiliate marketing programs, which means we may get paid commissions on editorially chosen products purchased through our links to retailer sites. This extraordinary illustrated guide charts that migration and its transformative impact on both Black identity and the cultural history of the US. With Edge, Huang guides readers to discover who they are, and how to use that knowledge to their advantage to build a powerful and successful life. Puberty is a particularly difficult time in a young adult’s life—from the increased hormones to the desire for privacy and confusing emotional upheavals. The director lays out the myriad forces at play in this ostensibly picture-perfect milieu in exacting detail, and his preference for longer takes means that the focus remains squarely on his performers. Beginning from her mother’s example, el Kaliouby has broken ground as one of the most visionary minds in the field of artificial intelligence. Brown stages his mayhem with assured efficiency, creating an air of impenetrable mystery through uneasy silence, compositions that devolve into cascading bubbles and a squishy foot-surgery sequence that would make body-horror maestro David Cronenberg proud. Survival in Russia is in many ways dependent on one’s cynicism, cunning, and willingness to cooperate with an insidiously oppressive government. That the Russian-controlled state is on a genocidal mission to “cleanse the blood” of the nation by exterminating its homosexual population is a terrifying reality brought to light by France, who details the efforts of these brave souls to use subterfuge to sneak at-risk individuals to safer European enclaves. This latest insider look at the Trump presidency comes from two Pulitzer Prize-winners, Carol Leonnig of the Washington Post and White House Bureau Chief Philip Rucker. In the ensuing weeks, 37 more burn victims perished due to bacterial infections at local hospitals, which journalist Catalin Tolontan and his colleagues soon link to a widespread scandal involving diluted disinfectants, gangster hospital managers, and amoral bribery and profiteering that incoming health minster Vlad Voiculescu is tasked with cleaning up. You can now purchase books directly from Penguin Random House on RIF. Also fixing its gaze on a one-legged chicken cautiously trudging through tall grass, and a herd of cows whose dark, mysterious eyes gaze intently at the camera, Kossakovsky’s dialogue-free portrait conveys essential truths about survival, togetherness and love through protracted takes that creep around and alongside its four-legged subjects. Nicolas Cage and H.P. No matter that her characters are plagued by malevolent supernatural forces, Natalie Erika James’ directorial debut is a thriller with grimly realistic business on its mind. Benjamin Ree’s intriguing The Painter and the Thief tells the tale of their unlikely relationship from both of their perspectives, charting its ups and downs with formal astuteness and inviting intimacy. Cristi’s playing-both-sides predicament is complicated by his relationship with Gilda (Catrinel Marlon), an alluring beauty whose femme fatale status is underlined by her famous noir name, and Porumboiu fractures his narrative so that chronology, like the various dialects employed by his characters, comes across as intricately coded. All rights reserved. Skylines December 18, 2020. Best Historical Movies on Netflix 2020 Who's Ready to Time Travel? Kitty Green’s The Assistant is the first great #MeToo film, a scathing look at the mundane day-to-day ways in which gender-imbalanced abuse and unfairness are built into workplace systems. The definitive biography of the legendary starlet now features new chapters including a look at the reopened investigation into the mysterious and tragic drowning that took her life. Not just a portrait of Neulinger’s internalized misery, it’s also a case study of how sexual misconduct is a crime passed on from generation to generation, a fact borne out by further revelations about his father’s upbringing alongside his assaultive brothers. Forced to navigate a chauvinistic world that treats them as disposable sexual playthings, denigrates them as whores when they attempt to fulfill that role, and then thwarts their desire for agency – and independence – at every turn, Autumn’s saga is all the more heartbreaking for being so ordinary. No amount of adult counter-programming can affect the kid, and when he attacks a female teacher (Myriem Akheddiou) for her modernist Islamic teachings, he winds up in a juvenile detention center and, then, at a farm where the affections of Louise (Victoria Bluck) complicate his worldview. Alexis Coe paints the portrait of a complicated and imminently fallible man. This latest edition is lifted by the whimsical and vivid illustrations of Maira Kalman. Watch Now. Beginning with those infants’ births, the film—from a startlingly close proximity that exudes tenderness and empathy—captures animal life in all its drudgery and beauty, full of struggle, nurturing, conflict, exploration and abandonment. With a host of titles tackling subjects such as unknown female pilots of World War II, the other major Nixon-era scandal, and reevaluations of sex, Facebook, and women’s health, there’s something coming down the pike for every reader. Courtesy of a phenomenal Cohen and Bakalova, Borat and Tutar’s sour-to-sweet relationship provides a sturdy backbone for a series of politicized hidden-camera gags in which the foreigners’ unacceptable behavior coaxes real people to expose themselves as bigots and sexists. Her work proved a lifeline that would eventually pull the devastated community back together. There, the husband and wife are preyed upon by a creepy trio—bowler hat-wearing dandy Mog (Peter Belli), unkempt Cherry (Brandy Litmanen) and giant Sampo (Morad Baloo Khatchadorian)—in an endless Groundhog Day-style time loop that always concludes with their deaths. At once an alternately joyous and distressed confrontation of mortality and impending grief, not to mention a celebration of the cinema’s (illusory, and yet magical) capacity to combat time and fate, Johnson’s follow-up to Cameraperson is a uniquely warts-and-all portrait of facing the inevitable with courage, creativity and devotion. Accepting fate, letting go of the past, and defining a new identity are all processes that require help from others, and thus prove deeply painful for Ruben, whose tattooed torso and bleach-blonde hair speak to his gung-ho go-it-alone spirit. From A to Z, each letter represents a watershed moment in progressive American history—from the spy work of Harriet Tubman to oft-overlooked Native occupations and the Occupy Movement. As a result, Murphy became a leading voice in the fight against the epidemic of gun-related violence in America. Yet there are profound depths to director Chloé Zhao’s follow-up to 2018’s The Rider, steeped as her film is in swirling issues of loss and sorrow, discovery and wonder, hardship and survival, and loneliness and togetherness. All three of these characters are suffering in their own distinct ways, due to a combination of loss, loneliness and fear, and Ahn (working from Hannah Bos and Paul Thureen’s precise script) intertwines their plights with few contrivances and a potent measure of empathy, especially once Del and Cody begin developing an unexpected bond. Oh, he’s a pretty big fan of sci-fi and fantasy as well. In the fictional northeast Brazilian town of Bacurau, residents are puzzled to discover that their home has disappeared from all GPS maps, and their cell service has ceased. That Garbus doesn’t let Mari off the hook for her own mistakes, while nonetheless casting a reproachful gaze at the individual and systemic failings that allow such crimes to occur – and go unsolved – only strengthens her cinematic case for compassion and togetherness as the bulwark against tragedy. Dramas don’t come much bleaker than Beanpole, director Kantemir Balagov’s wrenching story about the damage caused by war, and the exceedingly high cost of survival. In his final screen performance, Boseman matches his co-headliner’s intensity, his Levee so full of vibrant, self-destructive fury, desire and life that it’s a tragedy the performance stands as the late actor’s swan song. Copyright ©1995-2021 Penguin Random House. Less an attempt at a cohesive life story than an act of experimental expressionistic portraiture, it’s an audacious drama that energizes the staid biopic genre. There may be no more joyous 2020 cinematic scene than the closer of Thomas Vinterberg’s Another Round, a sloshed dramedy about four Copenhagen teachers’ attempts to reinvigorate their moribund lives by testing psychiatrist Finn Skårderud’s theory that humans’ optimal blood alcohol content level is .5%. With Guillaume Canet, Juliette Binoche, Vincent Macaigne, Christa Théret. Splitting his documentary into chapters based on Chatwin’s books, and guiding his action with typically lofty narration, Herzog embarks on the sort of “erratic quest” for answers to existence’s biggest questions that were favored by Chatwin. Aviva tackles the multifaceted nature of gender identity in fittingly diverse fashion, depicting the highs and lows of a couple’s relationship via narrative and modern-dance means – as well as by having both a man and a woman play each of its protagonists, male Eden (Bobbi Jene Smith, Tyler Phillips) and female Aviva (Zina Zinchenko, Or Schraiber). That, in turn, allows the HBO feature to rest on the sturdy shoulders of Jackman, who never resorts to caricature in embodying Tassone as a discontent striver whose eagerness for validation dovetailed with his lifelong deceptiveness, to disastrous ends. Good luck making coherent heads or tails of the film’s convoluted story about a CIA agent known only as the Protagonist (John David Washington) who teams with a shadowy colleague (Robert Pattinson) to discover the origins of bullets that, thanks to entropic “inversion,” can travel back in time. Their lives are further complicated by the arrival of Monica’s mom Soon-ja (Youn Yuh-jung), a foul-mouthed grandma whose relationship with David begins rockily before transforming into something profound. Ruben is a recovering junkie whose quest to regain his auditory senses is its own form of addiction, and Ahmed embodies him with equal parts ferociousness and anguish. It is a cogent and exhaustively researched argument for a better, safer America. These are the most anticipated action movies of 2020, with movies featuring Tom Cruise, Ryan Reynolds, Gal Gadot, and more. Autobiographical tales of trauma don’t come much more wrenching than Rewind, director Sasha Neulinger’s non-fiction investigation into his painful childhood. Dick Johnson is Dead is a daring masterpiece about the loss of loved ones, and of memory, and the movies’ ability—and, also, inability—to make the impermanent permanent. In a 1945 Leningrad still recovering from the end of WWII, lanky Iya (Viktoria Miroshnichenko), aka “Beanpole,” works as a nurse even though her military service has left her with a condition in which she becomes temporarily frozen. The mythic quality of the Cordillera – the towering eastern stretch of the Andes mountains that serves as both a protective and isolating barrier for the city of Santiago – is harmonized with the grand, destructive illusions of Chile’s Pinochet regime in The Cordillera of Dreams, documentarian Patricio Guzmán’s personal rumination on his homeland’s tumultuous history, and his relationship to it. The director’s follow-up to Madeline’s Madeline is a psychosexual affair about lost women driven crazy by callous, self-serving men, and their resultant fears and needs. Beginning with Kysilkova’s decision to paint Nordland’s portrait (peaking with one of the year’s most stunning scenes), their bond is forged by underlying similarities: traumatic and abusive pasts, as well as their habit of risking their lives for their addictions – in his case, drugs; in hers, painting. Utilizing a variety of disguises to mask his (fictional) identity – because everyone, by now, recognizes him on-sight – Borat reaffirms his status as cinema’s clown prince of pranksterism, culminating with a Rudy Giuliani interview that has to be seen to be believed. Yet greatly enhancing its trip back in time are the many recollections from WWII vets—including marine Hershel “Woody” Williams, who earned the Medal of Honor for singlehandedly taking out a series of enemy pillboxes with his flamethrower—whose commentary about their wartime duty serves as the film’s guiding narration. Repeatedly shouting out to both crime movies and Westerns – even its title and central conceit feel like references to Lauren Bacall’s iconic To Have and Have Not line of dialogue – the director orchestrates his action with slippery subtlety and droll humor, and he continually surprises on his way to an expressively non-verbal finale of light and music. Putting a poignant face on a contentious social topic, Never Rarely Sometimes Always tells the story of pregnant Pennsylvania 17-year-old Autumn (Sidney Flanigan), who with her loyal cousin Skylar (Talia Ryder) by her side, travels to New York to procure an abortion. Nonetheless, the alternately combative and chummy English pair remain in fine, funny form, and their swan song proves to be their most substantive collaboration since their maiden outing. Religious & inspirational books are the most popular non-fiction genre, whilst thrillers are the most popular audiobooks. Faced with this unexpected and debilitating turn of events, Ahmed’s Ruben is forced by his bandmate/partner Lou (Olivia Cooke) to leave their tour and park his Airstream trailer at a home for the deaf run by generous but stern Joe (Paul Raci). The tension between them, however, is only one facet of this semi-improvised drama, which also features a clandestine accord struck by Alice’s beloved nephew Tyler (Lucas Hedges) and her new agent Karen (Gemma Chan), both of whom are on the ship, the latter covertly. Mikki Kendall (Goodreads Author) 4.45 avg rating — 13,719 ratings. Those who can walk that path find success, but at great cost. The latest from the team behind Rad Women is an illustrated collection charting the significant political and cultural moments that have shaped American history. Cara Natterson, a pediatrician and bestselling author, researches teenage boys and puberty with her latest book. The darkness is all-consuming, as is despair over a lost past and future, and a purgatorial present, in Vitalina Varela, Pedro Costa’s aesthetically ravishing true tale of its protagonist, a Cape Verde resident who returns to Portugal mere days after her estranged husband’s death. Its studied imagery suggesting a daintier variation on Wes Anderson’s trademark visuals, Emma boasts an aesthetic confidence that’s matched by its performers. The Great Migration—a movement of millions of Black Americans from the largely rural South to the urban areas of the Northeast, Midwest and western United States—was a seminal moment in modern US history. Building from what she calls “minor feelings”—not small feelings, but dissonant ones—Hong creates a portrait of disparate cultural identities and the impact those clashing identities can have on virtually all facets of one’s life. In extended scenes of press conferences, presentations, boardroom meetings and community hearings—as well as snapshots of day-to-day life in Beantown’s diverse districts—Wiseman conveys the mundane toil of legislative and regulatory action. At Read It Forward, we have a healthy obsession with authors, stories, and the readers who love them. Subdued and melancholy, Jack’s journey is a familiar one, and yet O’Conner and Affleck – the latter turning in an expertly modulated, interior turn – shrewdly locate their protagonist’s alcoholism as the self-destructive byproduct of regret, resentment, fury and hopelessness. Takes readers on an exploration of time and humanity ’ s film becomes a straightforward courtroom drama the! Her work proved a lifeline that would eventually pull the devastated community back.. To film more suspenseful moment in cinema this year product was carefully curated by an Esquire editor against prejudice for... 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